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    STORY/SYNOPSIS

    A witty romantic drama, WORDS & PICTURES stars the engaging duo of Juliette Binoche and Clive Owen working together on-screen for the first time.

    Prep school English teacher Jack Marcus (OWEN) laments his students' obsession with social media and good grades rather than engaging with the power of the written word. A one-time literary star, Jack has not published in years filling his spare time with drink versus the art of language.

    He meets his match in Dina Delsanto (BINOCHE) — an abstract painter and new teacher on campus, who was once celebrated for her art. From the start, the two flirt and provoke each other with equal relish.

    With a performance review looming and his teaching job on the line, Jack hatches an inspired plan for galvanizing student interest in their studies: he declares a war between Words and Pictures, confident that the former can convey greater meaning than the latter. Dina and her art students accept the challenge between Jack and his English students, and the battle lines are drawn...

    The film is directed by Fred Schepisi, known for his work on both comedies (“Roxanne,” “Fierce Creatures”) and dramas (“A Cry in the Dark,” “Six Degrees of Separation”), based on a screenplay by Gerald Di Pego (“Message in a Bottle,” “Phenomenon”).

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    FRED SCHEPISI (Director) began his production career in the advertising world and served as head of the Film House for almost 20 years where he directed both commercials and documentaries. His first feature-length film was the semi-autobiographical “The Devil's Playground” (1976), which won six AFI awards, including Best Film, and established Fred's reputation as a talented director and writer. The success of his second film, “The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith” (1978), took him to the U.S. where he directed “Barbarosa” (1981), “Iceman” (1983), “Plenty” (1985), and “Roxanne” (1987), before returning to Australia to co-write and direct “Evil Angels” (a.k.a. “A Cry in the Dark”) (1988). “Evil Angels” received numerous awards and nominations, including the AFI Best Achievement in Direction and Best Screenplay Adaptation, and two Golden Globe nominations, for Best Screenplay and Best Director. Schepisi also directed the screen adaptation of John Guare's play “Six Degrees of Separation” (1993), starring Stockard Channing, Donald Sutherland and Will Smith. His other film credits include “The Russia House” (1990), “Mr. Baseball” (1992), “IQ” (1994), “Fierce Creatures” (1996), “Last Orders” (2001) and “It Runs in the Family” (2002). Most recently, he directed “The Eye of the Storm,” starring Charlotte Rampling, Geoffery Rush and Judy Davis, and the film adaptation of the best-selling novel by Richard Russo, “Empire Falls” (2004). Starring Paul Newman, Ed Harris, Joanne Woodward, Robin Wright Penn and Helen Hunt, “Empire Falls” debuted in the U.S. on HBO, was nominated for a number of awards and won a Golden Globe for Best Mini-Series or Motion Picture made for Television. Schepisi was awarded the Order of Australia for his service to the Australian film industry as a director, producer and screenwriter.

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    GERALD DiPEGO (Writer, Producer) is an award-winning screenwriter and novelist. His slate of feature films includes “Sharky’s Machine” (1981), directed by and starring Burt Reynolds; “Phenomenon” (1996) starring John Travolta, and “Instinct” (1999), starring Anthony Hopkins and Cuba Gooding Jr., both directed by directed by John Turteltaub; “Message in a Bottle” (1999), starring Kevin Costner, Robin Wright and Paul Newman, and “Angel Eyes” (2001) starring Jennifer Lopez, both directed by Luis Mondoki; and “The Forgotten” (2004), directed by Joseph Ruben and starring Julianne Moore.

    For television, DiPego has written 30 feature-length telefilms. “Born Innocent” (1974) and “A Family Upside Down” (1978) both garnered WGA nominations, and the latter won the Golden Globe Award as Best Film For Television. DiPego also wrote the telefilms “I Heard the Owl Call My Name” and “One More Mountain” which were both honored with Christopher Awards.

    DiPego’s novels include With a Vengeance (1977), Forest Things (1979), Shadow of the Beast (1984), Keeper of the City (1987), and Cheevey (1996).

    The son of an Italian immigrant father and an Italian-American mother, Gerald DiPego was born in Chicago in 1941 and moved to the small town of Round Lake, Illinois, where he worked in the family grocery store. He studied journalism at Northern Illinois University and worked as a reporter and teacher.

    In 1970, he moved to Los Angeles to work as a screenwriter and novelist. He is married to Christine DiPego, a singer and artist, and has two sons. He now lives in the Santa Ynez Valley in California.

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    CURTIS BURCH (Producer) is the President of Latitude Productions, a motion picture production company operating in Los Angeles. Curtis created Latitude after having spent 25 years learning and mastering the crafts of movie development, screenwriting, packaging and production. He worked as a senior development executive for producer Keith Barish at Taft-Barish Entertainment, at Largo Entertainment for producers Larry and Charles Gordon, for Rob Reiner’s Castle Rock Entertainment, and for director James Cameron at his Lightstorm Entertainment.

    As a creative executive, Burch participated in the development of many successful films. His first accomplishment as a development executive was to originate the idea of adapting the T.V. series “The Fugitive” into a feature film, which became a huge success and an Oscar nominee for Best Picture. He was subsequently involved in the development of the following films, to name only a few: “The Flintstones;” “The Running Man,” with Arnold Schwarzenegger; “Ironweed,” with Jack Nicholson and Meryl Streep; “The Serpent and the Rainbow,” directed by Wes Craven; “Bird on a Wire,” with Mel Gibson and Goldie Hawn; “The Hard Way,” with Michael J. Fox; “Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story;” “Unlawful Entry,” with Ray Liotta and Kurt Russell; “The American President,” with Michael Douglas and Annette Bening; “City Hall,” with Al Pacino; “Waiting For Guffman,” by Christopher Guest; and “Solaris,” with George Clooney, directed by Steven Soderbergh.

    Burch has also worked productively as a screenwriter. He wrote a speculative screenplay called “Forever, Anna,” which was sold to Castle Rock Entertainment where it is still in active development. More recently, he wrote a script for Lightstorm called “Ford,” which is based on a Hugo Award-winning short story by Dale Bailey.

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    NANCY RAE STONE (Executive Producer) has worked in both the independent and studio picture business for over 20 years. As an itinerant film worker, she worked in various locales in numerous capacities with such filmmakers as Paul Brickman (“Risky Business”), Jonathan Demme (“Who Am I This Time?”), Bryan Forbes (“The Naked Face”) and Michael Hoffman (“Restoration”). She moved up the ladder when she production managed and assistant directed a time-traveling indie produced by Roger Corman, “Time Trackers,” an experience which taught her how to squeeze maximum creative and monetary value out of every dollar while existing on five hours of sleep a night.

    Stone’s credits as an independent production manager, line producer, and producer include John Dahl’s “The Last Seduction,” with Linda Fiorentino, “Femme Fatale,” with Colin Firth, “Playing God,” with Angelina Jolie and David Duchovny; and Martin Bell’s “American Heart,” starring Jeff Bridges.

    Plucked from the indie world, Ms. Stone was asked to oversee Beacon Pictures/Sony’s “Air Force One,” directed by Wolfgang Peterson, in post production. After successful completion of that project, she went on to supervise all of Beacon’s studio features, eventually rising to the position of Executive Vice President of Production. In her capacity as Head of (Physical) Production for over nine years, she shepherded the production of many notable theatrical films, including “Spy Game,” “Bring It On,” “Family Man,” “13 Days,” “A Lot like Love,” “Emperor’s Club,” “The Hurricane,” and HBO’s “PU-239.” Stone worked from pre-production through domestic and international delivery, collaborating with such directors as Tony Scott, Norman Jewison, Roger Donaldson, Nigel Cole and Brett Ratner.

    Stone is a Women In Film Foundation board member, and currently co-chairs the Women in Film Finishing Fund, which provides finishing grants and in-kind services to projects by, for, and about women.

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    EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS: Bob Gass, Judy Burch Gass, Joseph Cohen, Richard Toussaint, Wade Barker, Derrick Evers

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    IAN BAKER (Cinematographer) has worked extensively with Fred Schepisi, serving as director of photography on “The Priest,” “The Devils Playground,” “The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith,” “Barbarosa,” “Ice Man,” “Plenty,” “Roxanne,” “A Cry in the Dark,” “Russia House,” “Mr. Baseball,” “Six Degrees of Separation,” “I.Q.” “Fierce Creatures, “It Runs in the Family,” “Empire Falls” and “Eye of the Storm.” Baker’s other films include “The Clinic,” “The Last Frontier,” “The Punisher,” “Everybody Wins,” starring Debra Winger and Nick Nolte, “The Chamber,” “Queen of the Damned,” “Japanese Story,” starring Toni Collette, and “Evan Almighty,” starring Steve Carell.

    A graduate of the Swinburne Film School at Victoria College of the Arts in Melbourne, Australia, Baker established Fresh Flicks, his own production company for television commercials, which operated for 15 years before he shifted focus to feature films. He has worked extensively in Europe, the U.K., Asia and the United States.

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    PATRIZIA VON BRANDENSTEIN (Production Designer) began her film career in 1972, with a debut screen credit as a set decorator on the acclaimed drama “The Candidate,” and subsequently worked as both a scenic artist and costume designer, with credits including “Between the Lines” and “Saturday Night Fever.”

    In 1985, Von Brandenstein won the Academy Award for her vividly-detailed rendering of the age of Mozart for “Amadeus.” In 1987, Von Brandenstein received her third Oscar nomination for Brian De Palma’s “The Untouchables,” and further distinguished herself with her work on the teen musical “Beat Street,” the high-society comedy drama “Six Degrees of Separation” and a return to the West for “The Quick and the Dead.”

    Her additional production credits include “A Chorus Line,” “Billy Bathgate,” “Sneakers,” “Leap of Faith,” “Just Cause,” “The People Vs. Larry Flynt” and “Mercury Rising,” as well as “A Simple Plan,” “Man on the Moon,” “Shaft,” “The Ice Harvest,” “All the King’s Men” and “Goya’s Ghosts.” Von Brandenstein also worked on the historical drama, “The Last Station,” directed by Michael Hoffman, for whom she designed “The Emperor’s Club” in 2002. She also worked on Neil Burger’s “Limitless” and on “Violet & Daisy,” the directing debut of Geoffrey Fletcher, Oscar-winning screenwriter of “Precious.” She recently worked on “Albert Nobbs,” an adaptation of a one-woman play directed by Rodrigo Garcia and starring Glenn Close and Mia Wasikowska, and David Mamet’s “Phil Spector” for HBO.

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    PETER HONESS, ACE (Editor) was nominated for an Academy Award and won a BAFTA for editing “L.A. Confidential.” Honess has worked on a number of films with Fred Schepisi, editing “Six Degrees of Separation,” “Mr. Baseball,” “The Russian House” and “Plenty.” Honess has also worked on several films directed by Chris Columbus, including “Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief,” “I Love You Beth Cooper” and “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets;” and on director John Schlesinger’s “The Next Best Thing,” “Eye For an Eye,” “Madame Sousatzka” and “The Believers.”

    Honess’ many films also include “The Golden Compass;” “Poseidon;” “Aeon Flux;” “Troy,” directed by Wolfgang Petersen; “Domestic Disturbance;” “The Fast and the Furious;” “The Kid;” “Mercury Rising;” “If These Walls Could Talk;” “Rob Roy;” “The Shadow,” “The Real McCoy,” “Ricochet” and “Highlander,” directed by Russell Mulcahy; “Next of Kin;” “Champions;” “Electric Dreams;” “Memed My Hawk,” directed by Peter Ustinov; “It’s Alive;” “Hell Up in Harlem;” and the documentary, “Following the Tundra Wolf.”

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    TISH MONAGHAN (Costume Designer) most recently completed “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rules” for FOX 2000, and Summit Entertainment’s “The Twilight Saga New Moon” and “Eclipse.” Other memorable credits include “The Exorcism of Emily Rose,” with Laura Linney and Tom Wilkinson, Lasse Hallstrom’s “An Unfinished Life,” with Robert Redford, Jennifer Lopez and Morgan Freeman; Chris Nolan’s “Insomnia,” with Al Pacino, Hilary Swank and Robin Williams; and “Happy Gilmore,” with Adam Sandler.

    Monaghan began working in the film industry in the 80’s, after a few years of working as a cutter for several theatrical productions in British Columbia. She initially worked as a costumer, cutter, and supervisor and was able to observe a number of designers at work by working as Assistant Costume Designer on such critically acclaimed films as “Snow Falling on Cedars,” “Cousins,” “The Accused” and “Roxanne.”

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    CLIVE OWEN (Jack Marcus): Academy Award nominee and Golden Globe winner Clive Owen is celebrated by audiences in the U.K., the United States and around the world. His diverse choice of film credits proves him to be one of the most versatile actors of our day. With his captivating performance in the title role of Mike Hodges’ sleeper hit Croupier, critics have compared him to the likes of Bogart, Mitchum, and Connery! In 2005 that he proved himself a screen star by winning a Golden Globe and picking up an Academy Award nomination for his role as Larry in Mike Nichols’ Closer. The film also starred Julia Roberts, Jude Law and Natalie Portman.

    Clive, a British actor, first came onto the scene in several British and American telefilms. In 1991 he starred in his first big hit, the UK television series CHANCER. Other UK telefilm credits included the BBC's SECOND SIGHT, which aired on PBS's MYSTERY!

    Clive made his film debut in Beeban Kidron’s Vroom in 1988, in which he restores a classic-American car to take off on the road with costar David Thewlis. Then, in 1991, he went on to play a brother who acts upon his incestuous feelings in Stephen Poliakoff’s Close My Eyes. Later, he continued to play complex characters as he stars as a reckless homosexual in corrupt pre-war Germany who finds unconditional love while in a Nazi war camp in Sean Mathias’ Bent. In 2001 and 2002 respectively, he went on to star in Joel Hershman’s offbeat British comedy, Greenfingers and Robert Altman’s star studded Gosford Park.

    Clive’s next films only added to his already brilliant and varied choice of film credits. He starred with Angelina Jolie in the romantic war drama Beyond Borders; the Mike Hodges thriller I’ll Sleep When I Am Dead; action war drama King Arthur; Sin City, which co-starred Bruce Willis, Benicio Del Toro, Rosario Dawson and Jessica Alba; Derailed opposite Jennifer Aniston; Spike Lee’s thriller Inside Man opposite Denzel Washington and Jodie Foster; Alfonso Cuaron’s critically acclaimed action-packed film Children of Men opposite Julianne Moore and Michael Caine; Michael Davis’s Shoot Em Up and Elizabeth: The Golden Age with Cate Blanchett, where he portrayed Sir Walter Raleigh. Other film credits include Tony Gilroy’s Duplicity opposite Julia Roberts, The International with Naomi Watts, Juan Carlos Fresnadillo’s The Intruders, Scott Hicks’ Boys are Back, Trust with Catherine Keener and Viola Davis, directed by David Schwimmer, The Killer Elite with Robert De Niro and Jason Statham, and James Marsh’ critically acclaimed Shadow Dancer with Andrea Riseborough.

    In 2011, Clive made his American TV debut in HBO’s Emmy nominated film Hemingway and Gellhorn, starring opposite Nicole Kidman and directed by Phil Kaufman. His performance earned him Emmy, SAG and Golden Globe nominations.

    Clive is also an acclaimed stage actor with roles included his portrayal of Romeo at the Young Vic, starring in Sean Mathias’ staging of Noel Coward’s Design for Living, and playing the lead role in Patrick Marber’s original production of Closer at the Royal National Theater in 1997. In the fall of 2001, he starred in London in Lawrence Boswell’s staging of Peter Nichols’ A Day in the Death of Joe Egg.

    Clive starred as “the driver” in the series of BMW internet short features entitled “The Hire,” each directed by John Frankenheimer, Ang Lee, Wong Kar-wai, Guy Ritchie, and Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu.

    Clive will next be seen in Guillame Canet’s Blood Ties with Marion Cotillard, Zoe Saldana, Mila Kunis and Billy Crudup, The Last Knights with Morgan Freeman and Fred Schepisi’s Words and Pictures with Juliette Binoche. It was recently announced that Owen will star in Steven Soderbergh’s Cinemax series The Knick, which he will also produce. The series is set to begin production later this year.

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    JULIETTE BINOCHE (Dina Delsanto) is the Parisian-born actress-dancer-writer who holds the unique distinction of being the only female to win Best Actress honors in all three main European Film Festivals -- the Palme d’Or at Cannes for “Certified Copy,” (2010), both the Volpi Cup and Pasinetti Award at Venice for “Three Colors: Blue” (1993), and Berlin’s Silver Bear for “The English Patient” (1996). For the latter title, Binoche’s remarkable interpretation also brought her the Academy Award, the BAFTA, the European Film Award and the National Board of Review honor as Best Supporting Actress for Anthony Minghella’s Oscarwinning Best Picture. Additionally, she collected nominations from the Chicago Film Critics Association, the Screen Actors Guild (Best Supporting Actress and Ensemble Award) and the HFPA’s Golden Globe.

    In a career in which she has displayed astonishing versatility and audacity in her character choices in both mainstream Hollywood productions and offbeat, auteurdriven vehicles, Binoche has collaborated with some of the world’s most respected filmmakers. That list includes a second project with Minghella (“Breaking and Entering”), Lasse Hallström (“Chocolat,” for which she received Oscar, BAFTA, SAG and Golden Globe nominations as Best Actress), David Cronenberg (“Cosmopolis”), Louis Malle (“Damage”), André Téchiné (“Alice and Martin,” “Rendezvous”), John Boorman (“In My Country”), Michael Haneke (“Code Unknown” and “Caché,” the latter for which she collected European Film and London Film Critics Circle nominations), Krzysztof Kieslowski (the “Three Colors” trilogy “Red,” “White” and “Blu), Olivier Assayas (“Summer Hours), Abel Ferrara (“Mary”), Mike Figgis (HBO’s short film, “Mara”),JeanLuc Godard (“Hail Mary,” her first major film role in a modernized, controversial interpretation of the Virgin Mary) and Philip Kaufman (“The Unbearable Lightness of Being”). It was the latter film, costarring alongside Daniel DayLewis and Lena Olin in her Englishlanguage debut, that brought both attention and acclaim in the U.S. at the young age of just 23.

    Over the years, she has become a mainstay at the annual Cesar Awards (the French equivalent to the Oscars), winning Best Actress honors for “Three Colors: Blue” (Trois couleurs: Bleu) in 1993, and earning seven more nominations over the years for Téchiné’s Rendezvous (1985), Leos Carax’s Mauvais sang (“Bad Blood,” 1986) and his Les Amants du PontNeuf (“The Lovers on the Bridge,” 1991), Malle’s “Damage” (1992), Le hussard sur le toit (“The Horseman on the Roof,” 1995), Patrice Leconte’s La veuve de SaintPierre (“The Widow of SaintPierre,” 2000) and Décalage horaire (“Jet Lag,” 2002).

    Binoche has also starred in the films “Bee Season” with Richard Gere, “Wuthering Heights” alongside Ralph Fiennes, “The Son of No One” opposite Al Pacino and Channing Tatum, “Dan in Real Life” with Steve Carell and “A Couch in New York” opposite William Hurt. Upcoming releases include Erik Poppe’s Norwegian production “A Thousand Times Good Night,” “Sils Maria” opposite Kristen Steward and Chloe Moritz, and the Frenchlanguage biopic, “Camille Claudel, 1915.” Other recent Frenchlanguage projects include A coeur ouvert (“An Open Heart”) with Edgar Ramirez, La vie d'une autre (“Another Woman’s Life”) and “Elles.”

    Binoche was born into a theatrical family in Paris. Her mother was an actress and drama teacher, her father a theatre director and sculptor. She embarked on her own stage career after briefly studying at Paris’ Conservatoire National Superieur d'Art Dramatique. In addition to her film work, she has frequently returned to the theatre, with credits that include the 1988 production of Chekov’s “The Seagull,” directed by Andrei Konchalovsky at the Théâtre de l’Odéon in Paris; “Naked” at the Almeida Theatre in London; the 2012 modernized version of August Strindberg's classic play “Miss Julie” at the Odeon Theater and London's Barbican; dancer Akram Khan’s 2008 dancedrama piece called “InI,” which premiered at the Royal National Theatre in London before embarking on a worldwide tour in 11 different venues; and her Broadway debut in Harold Pinter's “Betrayal” opposite Liev Schreiber and John Slattery, for which she earned a 2001 Tony nomination as Best Actress.

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    BRUCE DAVISON (Walt): An award-winning, acclaimed performer, Bruce Davison first gained notoriety on the Broadway stage in the role of Troilus in “Tiger at the Gates.” Following his breakthrough debut, Davison’s versatile talent continued to shine in numerous theater productions, notably “Streamers” and "The Normal Heart,” both of which earned him the Los Angeles Drama Critics Award. Throughout the seventies and eighties, he entranced audiences and critics alike with riveting performances as John Merrick in Broadway’s “The Elephant Man”; as Tom opposite Jessica Tandy in “The Glass Menagerie”; as Clarence in “Richard III;” as well as prominent roles in "The Caine Mutiny Court Martial," directed by Henry Fonda, and Off-Broadway plays, “A Home Away from Home, “The Cocktail Hour” and “How I Learned to Drive.”

    His portrayal of David, a middle-aged gay man, caring for his life partner dying of AIDS in the critically lauded and ground-breaking film, “Longtime Companion,” garnered numerous Best Supporting Actor honors, including a Golden Globe Award, an Independent Spirit Award, a National Society of Film Critics Award and a New York Film Critics Circle Award as well as an Academy Award nomination. Davison made his film debut in the coming-of-age film, “Last Summer,” co-starring Barbara Hershey and Richard Thomas. He went on to star in “The Strawberry Statement,” and then the eerie thriller “Willard.” Not one to shy away from the controversial, Mr. Davison portrayed a child molester in Robert M. Young’s prison drama “Short Eyes,” Jeffrey Dahmer’s father in “Dahmer,” and a bigoted, murderous pastor in “Hate Crime.” He appeared opposite Burt Lancaster in “Ulzana’s Raid” and Lucille Ball in “Mame.”

    Other film performances include “The Cure” and “It’s My Party,” both addressing the AIDS crisis; a grieving father in Robert Altman’s “Short Cuts”; a bamboozled parent in “Six Degrees of Separation”; a Puritan minister in “The Crucible”; an anti-mutant Senator in “X-men” and its sequel “X2.” Other notable works include “Apt Pupil,” “Breach,” “High Crimes,” “Runaway Jury” and “Far from Home: The Adventures of Yellow Dog.” Recent films include Rob Zombie’s “The Lords of Salem”; “Return of the Killer Shrews;” “Barlowe Mann;” “A Schizophrenic Love Story;” “The Bronx Bull” alongside William Forsythe, Joe Mantegna and Paul Sorvino; “Saving Lincoln,” with Penelope Ann Miller; and “37.” Upcoming films include “Get a Job,” starring Anna Kendrick and Bryan Cranston, and “Clean Me,” alongside Chris Sarandon and Robert Forster.

    Davison’s television performances include the films “Deadman’s Curve,” “Summer of My German Soldier,” “The Wave,” the Emmy-winning “The Gathering,” “Hidden in America” and “Titanic II.” For three seasons, he starred as George Henderson in “Harry and the Hendersons.” He had recurring roles on the series “Seinfeld” and “The Practice,” and received an Emmy nomination for his guest appearance in “Touched by an Angel.” Other television credits include “Drop Dead Diva,” “Chicago Hope,” “Hunter,” “Close to Home,” “The L Word,” “Knight Rider,” “Kingdom Hospital,” “Lost,” “Designing Women,” “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit,” “ V: The Series,” “Star Trek: Voyager,” “ Star Trek: Enterprise,” “ Battlestar Galactica,” “CSI: Miami,” “Ghost Whisperer,” “Castle,” and most recently, “Last Resort.”

    In addition to acting, in 2001, he directed and co-starred in the holiday television movie “Off Season,” garnering a Daytime Emmy Award nomination for Outstanding Directing in a Children’s Special.

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    NAVID NEGAHBAN (Will Rashid): Golden Globe Award winning television, film and stage actor, Navid Negahban recently starred on Showtime’s Emmy-winning drama series “Homeland,” in the role of the CIA’s most wanted terrorist “Abu Nazir.”

    Negahban’s film credits include a powerful leading role in the critically-acclaimed “The Stoning of Soraya M.,” and significant supporting roles in “Brothers,” starring Tobey Maguire and Jake Gyllenhaal; “Powder Blue,” with Jessica Biel and Forest Whitaker; and “Charlie Wilson’s War,” starring Tom Hanks, Julia Roberts and Amy Adams.

    Most widely recognized for his recurring role on Fox’s eighth and final season of the TV hit show “24,” Negahban has also appeared on “CSI: NY,” “CSI: Miami,” “NCIS: Los Angeles,” “Law & Order: SVU,” “The Closer,” “Criminal Minds,” “The Unit,” “Las Vegas,” “Lost,” “JAG,” “The West Wing,” “Without a Trace,” and “The Shield.”

    Born in Mashhad, Iran, Negahban took a liking to acting at the age of eight, and his passion for acting led him to Germany where he spent eight years honing his theatrical skills prior to arriving in the United States. He is fluent in English, Farsi and German. In his spare time, enjoys traveling, studying anthropology, shooting pool, driving and playing poker.

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    AMY BRENNEMAN (Elspeth Croyden) earned a B.A in Comparative Religion at Harvard University. She studied for a year in Kathmandu, Nepal where she focused on sacred Buddhist dance and indigenous ritual.

    She’s a founding member of the Cornerstone Theater Company, which specializes in site-specific original theater pieces centered on themes of social justice. Cornerstone credits include Juliet in “Romeo and Juliet” (Port Gibson, Mississippi), Natasha in “Three Sisters” (Montgomery, West Virginia), Clytemnestra in “The Oreisteia” (Schurz, Nevada), and Solveig in “Peer Gynt” (Eastport, Maine). Other theater credits include CSC Repertory, Yale Rep, Lincoln Center, LA Theater Works, The American Repertory Theater and most recently the world premiere of “Rapture Blister Burn” at Playwrights Horizons in New York.

    Brenneman’s TV Credits include starring in “Judging Amy,” for which she garnered two TV Guide Awards, three Golden Globe Award nominations, a Producer’s Guild Nomination, three Emmy Award nominations, a People’s Choice Award nomination and a SAG nomination. She created and executive produced the show, which was based on the work of her mother, the Honorable Frederica Brenneman. Other television series include “NYPD Blue” (SAG award, two Emmy Nominations), “Frasier,” and she recently completed a six-year run on the ABC drama “Private Practice.”

    Her films include “Mother And Child,” “Nine Lives,” “The Jane Austen Book Club,” “Casper,” “Heat,” “Daylight,” “Friends And Neighbors,” “88 Minutes,” “Fear,” “Bye- Bye Love,” “Downloading Nancy,” “Things You Can Tell Just By Looking At Her,” and the upcoming “Look of Love” opposite Ed Harris. Brenneman’s original work includes the play “Mouth Wide Open,” as well as the documentary about the CHIME Institute entitled “The Way the World Should Be,” which she directed and produced.

    Political and activist work focuses on children’s health and accessible education, which includes working on behalf of The CHIME Institute, TASH, CARE, and the CEC (Center for Exceptional Children). In April, she gave the keynote speech for CEC’s annual gala. Additionally, she is an advocate for women’s health and reproduction rights, for which she is involved with the Feminist Majority and NARAL. Over the last several years, she has lent her name and her support to the Crohns & Colitis Foundation (CCFA). Her efforts include participating in this year's PSA campaign and contributing a video for last year's members' conference in New York.

    Brenneman is married to film director Brad Silberling and has two children.

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    VALERIE TIAN (Emily) began working in film and television at the age of 12. Her first big break was booking the recurring role of Claire Rodgers on the series “Black Sash.” Since then, she has had roles in a slate of films, most notably “Juno,” as well as “21 Jump Street,” “Charlie St Cloud,” “The Moth Diaries,” “Percy Jackson And the Olympians,” “Jennifer’s Body,” “Dim Sum Funeral,” “Fantastic Four,” “Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants” and “Bob the Butler.” Her television credits include a recurring role on “Arrow,” and the role of Wendy in “The Secret Life of the American Teenager.”

    Tian lives in Vancouver, Canada. In addition to acting, she is also a talented clothing designer and artist.

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    JOSH SSETTUBA (Cole)

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    CHRISTIAN SCHEIDER (Tony) is a graduate of Bard College, where he received a B.A. in Philosophy and studied theater extensively, and where he trained as an actor. His theater roles have ranged from John in “Eccentricities of A Nightingale” by Tennessee Williams to Ronald Reagan/Adolf Hitler/Queen Elizabeth in “Passion Play” by Sarah Ruhl.

    Recently, Scheider produced, directed and performed in “8,” a dramatization of the Proposition 8 trials in California, written by Academy-Award winning screenwriter Dustin Lance Black. Scheider’s production was set in the actual courtroom of a predominantly Republican township in Duchess County, NY.

    His latest performance was at the 2013 ARS Nova Theater Festival via Skype as Venture Capitalist in the New Saloon production of “William Shakespeare’s Mom” by Milo Cramer. Scheider just finished a production of “In The Next Room or, The Vibrator Play” as Leo Irving in Bridgehampton, NY, and this august in the Hamptons he will be staring in “The Murderer” by Ray Bradbury, which he and director Tucker Marder have adapted – for the first time ever – to the stage.

    WORDS AND PICTURES marks Scheider’s screen debut.

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    JANET KIDDER (Sabine)

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  • During the American Revolution, small cubes of indigo were used for money when all forms of paper currency became worthless. The process of extracting dye from indigo is said in India to make women sterile. Descriptions of indigo production in Louisiana claim that the dye-producing process “repulsed livestock” and “killed fish in streams”. The notion that indigo is toxic seems puzzling given that the indigo legume is often fed to animals in Latin America.


Image Source : Dan Brady

    During the American Revolution, small cubes of indigo were used for money when all forms of paper currency became worthless. The process of extracting dye from indigo is said in India to make women sterile. Descriptions of indigo production in Louisiana claim that the dye-producing process “repulsed livestock” and “killed fish in streams”. The notion that indigo is toxic seems puzzling given that the indigo legume is often fed to animals in Latin America.


    Image Source : Dan Brady

  • The first recorded photograph was taken by it’s inventor Nicéphore Niépce, in 1825 and was actually a photo-etching. This process is called Heliography, the process used “Bitumen of Judea, a naturally occurring asphalt, as a coating on glass or metal. It hardened in proportion to its exposure to light. When the plate was washed with oil of lavender, only the hardened areas remained.”

    The first recorded photograph was taken by it’s inventor Nicéphore Niépce, in 1825 and was actually a photo-etching. This process is called Heliography, the process used “Bitumen of Judea, a naturally occurring asphalt, as a coating on glass or metal. It hardened in proportion to its exposure to light. When the plate was washed with oil of lavender, only the hardened areas remained.”

  • Show me a sign…

    Show me a sign…

  • Love letter from Frida Kahlo to Diego Rivera

    Love letter from Frida Kahlo to Diego Rivera

  • brandyevephotos:

Drawing of Francesco Woodman in her studio - pencil on paper

    brandyevephotos:

    Drawing of Francesco Woodman in her studio - pencil on paper

  • Los Angeles at night with the rain through a car window - oil on paper by Brandy Eve Allen

    Los Angeles at night with the rain through a car window - oil on paper by Brandy Eve Allen

  • "Missing Persons" - Milk Carton sculptures made from plaster

    "Missing Persons" - Milk Carton sculptures made from plaster

  • Appropriated book with gesso and collage by Brandy Eve Allen

    Appropriated book with gesso and collage by Brandy Eve Allen

  • "I am incapable of conceiving infinity, and yet I do not accept finity." - Simone de Beauvoir 

Photo by Henri Cartier-Bresson, Paris, 1952

    "I am incapable of conceiving infinity, and yet I do not accept finity." - Simone de Beauvoir

    Photo by Henri Cartier-Bresson, Paris, 1952

  • The Kassena people build their houses entirely of local materials: earth, wood and straw. After construction, the woman draws murals on the walls using colored mud and white chalk. The motifs and symbols are either taken from everyday life, or from religion and belief. Adding cow dung, compacting layers of mud, burnishing the final layer, and varnishing with néré all make the designs withstand wet weather, enabling the structures to last longer.

    The Kassena people build their houses entirely of local materials: earth, wood and straw. After construction, the woman draws murals on the walls using colored mud and white chalk. The motifs and symbols are either taken from everyday life, or from religion and belief. Adding cow dung, compacting layers of mud, burnishing the final layer, and varnishing with néré all make the designs withstand wet weather, enabling the structures to last longer.

  • Pla·gia·rize : to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own : use (another’s production) without crediting the source

  • Hieroglyphs, also known as “God’s words”, were a system of writing used by ancient Egyptians that combined the use of graphics and alphabetic elements.  

The word hieroglyph is a compound Greek adjective representing “hiero” which is “sacred”, and “glyph” which means carve or engrave.

    Hieroglyphs, also known as “God’s words”, were a system of writing used by ancient Egyptians that combined the use of graphics and alphabetic elements.

    The word hieroglyph is a compound Greek adjective representing “hiero” which is “sacred”, and “glyph” which means carve or engrave.

  • When was the last time you went to the museum and saw some art? 

brandyevephotos:

sam at the #moca museum #gif
    When was the last time you went to the museum and saw some art?

    brandyevephotos:

    sam at the #moca museum #gif

  • Watercolor on paper

SOURCE

    Watercolor on paper

    SOURCE